kenyatta:

No.
More evolutionarily mature fandoms are stronger, more resilient fan communities. They’ve been around a while and have regular customs, language, and practices.
Newer, less organized fandoms are ones that haven’t developed many of these features yet. These fandoms are more vulnerable to outside influence and can have their development stunted by it. (See Tricia Wang’s #elasticself or this recent Pew Research study for all of the reasons why.)
The fandoms that Aja’s article speaks about concentrates on the more evolutionarily mature ones. They have a season/book/movie release or two under their belts. They’ve had time to express their love for their fandom, identify other fans, and start sharing ideas and emotions and building relationships.  Repeated enough times, these practices grow and suddenly the fans find themselves with their own community, culture, and language.
In Deleuze-speak, Tumblr has been territorialized with this fandom.
Eventually, these fandoms get to the point where they become full-blown hierarchical societies so resilient that they will actively fend off anything that feels like an attack on their community.
These are the fandoms that Aja speaks of. These are the fandoms that we as a Tumblr community are most proud of. These are the fandoms that can balance out and absorb a big corporation’s “official” presence and all of the advertising, marketing, personnel, and money resources they bring. High-res

kenyatta:

No.

More evolutionarily mature fandoms are stronger, more resilient fan communities. They’ve been around a while and have regular customs, language, and practices.

Newer, less organized fandoms are ones that haven’t developed many of these features yet. These fandoms are more vulnerable to outside influence and can have their development stunted by it. (See Tricia Wang’s #elasticself or this recent Pew Research study for all of the reasons why.)

The fandoms that Aja’s article speaks about concentrates on the more evolutionarily mature ones. They have a season/book/movie release or two under their belts. They’ve had time to express their love for their fandom, identify other fans, and start sharing ideas and emotions and building relationships.  Repeated enough times, these practices grow and suddenly the fans find themselves with their own community, culture, and language.

In Deleuze-speak, Tumblr has been territorialized with this fandom.

Eventually, these fandoms get to the point where they become full-blown hierarchical societies so resilient that they will actively fend off anything that feels like an attack on their community.

These are the fandoms that Aja speaks of. These are the fandoms that we as a Tumblr community are most proud of. These are the fandoms that can balance out and absorb a big corporation’s “official” presence and all of the advertising, marketing, personnel, and money resources they bring.

'Nielsen has done a lot of research as to whether social media is helping people to tune in to TV,' he says, noting that a show's traction on Twitter and Tumblr is starting to affect how networks pitch shows to the all-important advertisers. 'They're no longer just including Nielsen ratings. They're also including social TV data.'

The Few, The Fervent: Fans Of ‘Supernatural’ Redefine TV Success | NPR 

(via bookoisseur)

(via bookoisseur)

We need to remember, first of all, that story­telling is a partnership, an act of co-creation, not a matter of the author leading the audience by the nose. But this raises questions of control—as in, who controls the story, the author or the audience? After 150 years of mass media, we find it all too easy to assume that by taking any posture other than utter pas­sivity, the audience is going to usurp the role of the author: It’s choose-your-own-adventure or nothing. But that’s not ac­tually what most audiences want.

People want a story they can immerse themselves in—an emotionally gripping narrative they can in some way inhabit. They’re asking to be a passenger, not an onlooker. So as an author, how do you make room for them without giving them the wheel? That’s the question.

Frank Rose’s writeup of the Future of StoryTelling summit: “What’s the audience got to do with it?”

How could they both get it so wrong? I believe it is because neither have actually understood how social media works as a conversation and as a community. Emma Keller’s piece is awful in many ways as she violated, in my view, fundamental journalistic ethics (and rather than a true understanding and apology, she expressed “her regrets” not giving advance notice to someone she was communicating with that she was going to write a story about her, and for quote private messages without permission.)

Bill Keller’s piece is worse in other ways because instead of trying to understand why his wife’s piece drew such ire, he furthers the misunderstandings which are not just wrong, but are hurtful to a gravely ill person who is not yet dead, thank you very much. Also, Bill Keller has a huge platform so he should have spent more time actually researching the piece rather than what seems like an ill-advised rush to defend his wife.

How should it have been written? In one word: When trying to understand social media presence, dear journalists, don’t “peruse.” Engage. Because that’s how the medium works.

Social Media Is a Conversation, Not a Press Release — Technology and Society — Medium (via kenyatta)

As Kevin would say, “social media” is to “media” as “egg” is to “eggplant” and yet still so many people still get it wrong.

(via kenyatta)

unionmetrics:

The Day of the Doctor on Tumblr: The Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Special 
Tumblr is made for fandoms (Tumblr + Fandom = OTP, if you will) and if last weekend’s Tumblr activity around the 50th anniversary episode of Doctor Who is any indication, the Doctor Who fandom is the biggest of them all.

On Saturday, November 23rd - the day the 50th anniversary special aired - 1 million people shared 5 million posts on Tumblr. Those posts earned another 3.1 million likes that day.
With a whole host of activities organized around the anniversary, Doctor Who fans had plenty to keep them busy. That includes the airing of the episode and special events - both online and in-person - throughout the weekend. Over the three-day anniversary celebration, more than 10.6 million total posts from 2 million people were shared on Tumblr, and another 1.4 million tweets (from more than 500k people) were posted to Twitter. This is huge engagement from a very active fan base.
The most popular Doctor Who fan post from the weekend has already earned 143k notes, while the most popular post from the official Doctor Who blog has earned 142k notes. The official Doctor Who blog knows, loves, and fully embraces its fandom. The gif in their top post is from the 50th anniversary special and celebrates very poignantly and simply the last fifty years of the show, while the fan post reflects how deeply connected many of the fans feel with the show, regardless of their age (and therefore the number of years they’ve had to become involved with it).
Over on Twitter, the most popular Doctor Who tweet over the weekend was from the official @BBCDoctorWho Twitter account, and featured a still image from the anniversary special of the new Doctor’s eyes. It has earned well over 6,000 retweets so far.
For Tumblr, these are the biggest numbers we’ve seen so far for a televised event. In comparison, the MTV Video Music Awards - previously the largest event - earned 2.1 million posts from 1.1 million contributors in a day, and the Super Bowl saw 1.5 million posts from 1.1 million people.
These numbers show us yet again that Tumblr is the place to go for a deep dive into a fandom for a show you love. Only on Tumblr would Doctor Who outperform the Super Bowl, and we love it for that very reason. That is, in the words of Nine, “Fantastic!”
High-res

unionmetrics:

The Day of the Doctor on Tumblr: The Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Special 

Tumblr is made for fandoms (Tumblr + Fandom = OTP, if you will) and if last weekend’s Tumblr activity around the 50th anniversary episode of Doctor Who is any indication, the Doctor Who fandom is the biggest of them all.

On Saturday, November 23rd - the day the 50th anniversary special aired - 1 million people shared 5 million posts on Tumblr. Those posts earned another 3.1 million likes that day.

With a whole host of activities organized around the anniversary, Doctor Who fans had plenty to keep them busy. That includes the airing of the episode and special events - both online and in-person - throughout the weekend. Over the three-day anniversary celebration, more than 10.6 million total posts from 2 million people were shared on Tumblr, and another 1.4 million tweets (from more than 500k people) were posted to Twitter. This is huge engagement from a very active fan base.

The most popular Doctor Who fan post from the weekend has already earned 143k notes, while the most popular post from the official Doctor Who blog has earned 142k notes. The official Doctor Who blog knows, loves, and fully embraces its fandom. The gif in their top post is from the 50th anniversary special and celebrates very poignantly and simply the last fifty years of the show, while the fan post reflects how deeply connected many of the fans feel with the show, regardless of their age (and therefore the number of years they’ve had to become involved with it).

Over on Twitter, the most popular Doctor Who tweet over the weekend was from the official @BBCDoctorWho Twitter account, and featured a still image from the anniversary special of the new Doctor’s eyes. It has earned well over 6,000 retweets so far.

For Tumblr, these are the biggest numbers we’ve seen so far for a televised event. In comparison, the MTV Video Music Awards - previously the largest event - earned 2.1 million posts from 1.1 million contributors in a day, and the Super Bowl saw 1.5 million posts from 1.1 million people.

These numbers show us yet again that Tumblr is the place to go for a deep dive into a fandom for a show you love. Only on Tumblr would Doctor Who outperform the Super Bowl, and we love it for that very reason. That is, in the words of Nine, “Fantastic!”

How big was 'Doctor Who' on Tumblr on Saturday?

doctorwho:

Since we’re talking numbers, we should mention that we asked Tumblr analytics firm Union Metrics to tell us just how big the fandom was on The Day of The Doctor…

And the answer came back in a single sentence:

image

Because of you, Saturday, November 23, 2013, The Day of The Doctor, was the biggest television event they’d ever seen on Tumblr.

5.0 million posts
4.9 million reblogs
3.1 million likes
1.0 million contributors

It was bigger than the VMAs, the Super Bowl, and the Grammys…

…combined.

We’ve always said that the Doctor Who fandom on Tumblr was bigger on the inside. Now you have a better idea of just how big that inside is.

And what’s amazing is we’re still growing.

Congrats, Whovians.

(via kenyatta)